Standardized Patient Health Insurance Identification Cards get a Boost.

mgma-cardStandardized patient health insurance identification cards got a big boost earlier this month when it was announced that Humana had joined United HealthGroup by pledging its support to the Medical Group Management Association’s, (MGMA’s), Project SwipeIT.

According to the MGMA website, Project SwipeIT “is a health care industry-wide initiative meant to advance the adoption of standardized patient identification (ID) cards containing WEDI compliant, machine-readable information.”

mgma-backA news report carried by aafp.org, said that Project SwipeIT, launched in late January, and is an industry-wide initiative to advance the adoption of standardized patient health insurance ID cards containing machine-readable information. As part of the project, MGMA has asked health insurers, vendors and health care providers to work toward supporting the standardized cards by Jan. 1, 2010.

The aafp.org story notes that the new ID cards are designed to provide real-time patient information at the point of care. The cards comply with standards developed by the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange, which should ensure uniformity of information, appearance and technology.

The MMGA website says that everyone will benefit from using the cards. Patients will have less hassle from denied claims. Providers will save money on labor and copying, and will get paid more quickly and accurately. Insurers will save by doing less manual work on rejected claims. Ultimately, employers should see savings from less growth in health care costs.

MGMA estimates that machine-readable patient ID cards could save physician offices and hospitals as much as $1 billion a year by reducing unnecessary administrative efforts and denied claims.

The cost of a WEDI-compliant, machine-readable card is 50 cents - only a fraction more than the nonstandardized, plastic or paper cards that most insurers use now, according to MGMA. The group maintains that the savings that insurers will see from reduced claim denials, provider inquiries, re-work and labor will far exceed this cost. As for the providers, MGMA says that a card reader to scan the new cards costs less than $200.

MGMA is asking insurers to agree to issue WEDI-compliant, machine-readable cards by January 2010Standardized patient health insurance identification cards got a big boost earlier this month when it was announced that Humana had joined United HealthGroup by pledging its support to the Medical Group Management Association’s, (MGMA’s), Project SwipeIT.

According to the MGMA website, Project SwipeIT “is a health care industry-wide initiative meant to advance the adoption of standardized patient identification (ID) cards containing WEDI compliant, machine-readable information.”

A news report carried by aafp.org, said that Project SwipeIT, launched in late January, and is an industry-wide initiative to advance the adoption of standardized patient health insurance ID cards containing machine-readable information. As part of the project, MGMA has asked health insurers, vendors and health care providers to work toward supporting the standardized cards by Jan. 1, 2010.

The aafp.org story notes that the new ID cards are designed to provide real-time patient information at the point of care. The cards comply with standards developed by the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange, which should ensure uniformity of information, appearance and technology.

The MMGA website says that everyone will benefit from using the cards. Patients will have less hassle from denied claims. Providers will save money on labor and copying, and will get paid more quickly and accurately. Insurers will save by doing less manual work on rejected claims. Ultimately, employers should see savings from less growth in health care costs.

MGMA estimates that machine-readable patient ID cards could save physician offices and hospitals as much as $1 billion a year by reducing unnecessary administrative efforts and denied claims.

The cost of a WEDI-compliant, machine-readable card is 50 cents - only a fraction more than the nonstandardized, plastic or paper cards that most insurers use now, according to MGMA. The group maintains that the savings that insurers will see from reduced claim denials, provider inquiries, re-work and labor will far exceed this cost. As for the providers, MGMA says that a card reader to scan the new cards costs less than $200.

MGMA is asking insurers to agree to issue WEDI-compliant, machine-readable cards by January 2010.

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