Humana Innovation Center Using Social Media to Engage Consumers and Broaden the Meaning of the Brand.

This is the second post in my occasional series in the use of social media by health plans to engage their members to become healthier and better consumers of health care services. By social media, I am referring to activities that integrate technology, telecommunications and social interaction, and the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio.[1] In short, I am talking about blogging and the use of web sites like YouTube, MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter.

Recently, I had the chance to talk with Greg Matthews, Director of Consumer Innovations at Humana Inc. Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, Humana is one of the nation’s largest publicly traded health and supplemental benefits companies, with approximately 11.7 million medical members. Humana offers a wide array of health and supplemental benefit plans for employer groups, government programs and individuals.

Greg said that one of Humana’s most widely-used social media programs has been the use of YouTube to host a number of videos that take a light-hearted approach to explaining complex health insurance plans and concepts. The channel called Stay Smart Stay Healthy contains links to a number of short videos with titles like Why is Health Care so Expensive? (202,000 views), and How Does Health Insurance Work? (79,000 views). So far, all the videos combined have been viewed over one million times. A similar program was launched in December to educate pre-retirees about their health care options. This retiree planning community is called REAL, and can be found at http://realforme.com/.

However, according to Greg, most of the social media experimentation currently taking place in the Humana Innovation Center has more to learning and more broadly branding the company than it does with specifically engaging with plan members to achieve tangible results.

For example, this past summer, Humana introduced Freewheelin. Jason Falls, the director of social media at a Louisville ad agency, writes extensively about Freewheelin in a post on his blog. In his post, Social Media Case Study: Humana’s Freewheelin. Jason described Freewheelin as “…a bicycle sharing program with a community of green- and health-friendly participants at its core. It’s not just a set of stations where you can rent a bike for a few hours in big cities. It’s that, but with the fundamental higher purpose of promoting better health for humans and the earth as the fabric that ties its users together.”

The program was kicked off this summer in Louisville and also during political conventions in Denver and Minneapolis. Greg’s group used a wide variety of social media vehicles including Meetup.com, a Facebook page, its own blog and a Twitter stream to build buzz about the program. And it worked; Greg told me that over 2,200 news stories were written about the program. But, as Jason Falls noted, it was really about more than just creating hype. The efforts in the convention cities alone resulted in eight days of rides, over 7,500 total rides, 41,000 miles ridden, 1.2 million calories burned and carbon offset of 14.6 metric tons.

I’ll share more of my discussion with Greg Matthews in upcoming posts. In the meantime, Greg and his colleagues are blogging about healthcare innovation at CrumpleItUp.com.


[1] Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media

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